Hot on Holborn’s heels (at Little Mountain), here are two more fancy-schmancy bike facilities in new buildings.

First, from Portland, where news of Vancouver’s surge in bike riding is making their presumed N.A. cycling mode share supremacy a point of debate.

Michael Anderson at BikePortland.org tells us about the Lloyd Circle Station in the Lloyd 700 Building, which will be open to anyone who ponies up the fee. Open 24 hours, with 600 bike parking spaces, mechanics, lockers, showers, repair stands, bike wash, and a short-term valet parking service, it’s solid bragging rights competition to the upcoming Holborn facility.

Portland’s biggest, baddest bike parking facility is about to open

Though the Cycle Station obviously won’t be for everyone, it’s worth taking a moment to savor this milestone: one of the country’s best bike parking facilities is opening to the public in Portland and operating more or less as a business, planning to make money by giving hundreds of people a place to park their bicycles.

Governments can mandate bike lanes, bike parking and even bike programming. But when private businesses get in on the bike game, biking isn’t just an aspiration or an ideology. It’s a reality.

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It looks as though an entire Portland district (Lloyd) is behind this kind of offering, through a unique transportation-focussed organization called “Go Lloyd“. Biking is only one of the modes they support.

Go Lloyd was founded in 1994 as the Lloyd District Transportation Management Association (TMA). TMAs are public/private partnerships formed so that employers, developers, building owners, and government entities can work collectively to establish policies, programs, and services to address local transportation issues and foster economic development. TMAs are established within a limited geographic area to address the specific needs of their members. . . .

. . . . Go Lloyd creates a thriving environment for business and community by building partnerships, delivering targeted transportation programs, and fostering economic vitality.

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Next, from Fastcoexist, news of an office tower in Oslo, Norway, designed by Code Architecture. The building, scheduled for 2020 completion, will have 8,300 sq. m. of solar panels, and significant attention paid to sustainability.  See this PDF for more detail than normal.

The building (Oslo Solar) will feature a large ramp for people on bikes to get to a spiffy parking facility.  Note the cool cargo bike in the illustration. But car parking is limited to a few electric car charging stations.

When it’s completed, Oslo Solar will produce more energy than it uses—and possibly more than any other building in Europe. . .

. . . The design is meant to encourage anyone coming to the building to get there on a bike instead of driving. “There are several trends pointing in that direction,” says Anders Solaas, executive vice president for letting and development at Entra, the building’s developer. “The political leadership in Oslo is crystal clear on [its] large ambitions for increased use of bicycles. Employees are making commuting their daily workout through cycling.”  [Ed. The site is apparently surrounded by public transport, and a major bike route]

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Many thanks to Ron Richings and Tom Trottier for the links.