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Today in the Inbox:

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First up: the daily briefing from Foreign Policy lays it out:

Barack Obama’s administration says that climate change poses a clear and present danger to the United States that will only grow worse over time as droughts, floods, and storms become part of everyday life throughout the country.

Unfortunately for the White House, the politics of tackling climate change are dismal: Republicans have grown even more hostile to the issue in recent years, it barely registers in public opinion polls, and this year’s midterm elections make dramatic action a virtual impossibility.

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Next, a New York Times Alert explains: On Climate, Republicans and Democrats Are From Different Continents:

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Differing Views

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A link to the National Climate Assessment from the Sightline Daily provides a locally relevant summary:

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Northwest

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Today’s Sun, augmenting my latest post on Climate Change Porn, provides more supportive evidence: “Torrential rain destroys South Surrey crops.”

Nine acres of Jamers Yue’s crops were destroyed after the South Surrey area was pounded by more than 91 millimetres of rain on Sunday. He had to strap on hip waders to survey the damage the next day, and the water reached halfway up his thighs.

SunBy Monday, ducks and geese were landing on the flooded plain, diving down to get a taste of the leafy greens below.

“I lost three generations of crops here. For the whole month of June I won’t have anything to sell. It’s all gone,” Yue said.

Sunday’s heavier-than-expected rainfall resulted in localized flooding in Langley as well, according to Environment Canada meteorologist Doug Lundquist. In South Surrey, a small mudslide closed a section of 16th Avenue, and there were reports of flooded basements and roads in Langley and White Rock.

White Rock was soaked with 87 millimetres, more than a month’s worth of rain, in the 36 hours of the storm and set a new rainfall record of 83 millimetres on Sunday alone.

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Good LifeAnd then, an hour ago, an email from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, announcing their new public engagement project: “a documentary film and interactive website called The Good Life – The Green Life. The film is a story about everyday green heroes – people struggling to figure out how we can deal with big environmental problems like climate change.”

Well-intentioned and earnest, of course, and beautifully filmed.

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Of the seven parts, here’s the one on transportation:

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And that takes us to 10 am.

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It’s not hard to draw the conclusion: Science, evidence and policy count for little when overridden by political bias and reluctant leadership.  But nature doesn’t care, of course.  You don’t declare war on physics, chemistry and biology; you only respond.

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UPDATE – At 11:30, another New York Times alert comes in: “The G.O.P. Can’t Ignore Climate Change.”  From Jon Huntsman, a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012:

So obtuse has become the (Republican) party’s dialogue on climate change that it’s now been reduced to believing or not believing, as if it were a religious mantra.

This approach reached a new low last month during a North Carolina congressional debate at which all the Republican candidates chuckled at a question on climate change — as if they had been asked about their belief in the Tooth Fairy. Is climate change a fact, they were asked. All four answered no.

This is a shortsighted strategy that is wrong for the party, wrong for the country and wrong for the next generation. It simply kicks a big problem farther down the field. And it’s a problem we — as solution-seeking Republicans — have the opportunity to solve. …

Our approach as a party should be one of neither denial nor extremism. Science must guide sensible policy discussions that will lead to well-informed choices, which may mean considering unexpected alternatives. We aren’t inspiring much confidence, especially among millennials, who at least want an intelligent conversation on the subject.

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