___________________________________________________________________

.

SAD STATS

Highlights of US statistics available from the US Department of Transportation: Traffic Safety Facts – 2011 Data (released in April, 2013 and still the most recent)

  • 677 bicyclists died on US roads in 2011 (623 in 2010. 1,003 back in 1975)
  • 48,000 bicyclists were injured in traffic 1n 2011 (52,000 in 2010)
  • Bicyclists 15 and under killed in 2011: 85. (13%) Injured: 66,017 (23%)
  • Bicyclist deaths represented 2.1% of all 2011 traffic fatalities.
  • Average age of a bicyclist killed on US roads: 43 (36 in 2002)
  • Average age of a bicyclist injured on US roads: 32 (28 in 2002)
  • Males killed 85%. Males injured 78%.
  • Nearly one fourth (23%) of the cyclists killed were drunk. (Blood alcohol over .08 g/dl)
  • Fatal crashes typically were urban (69%) and not at intersections (59%).

Pedalcyclist Deaths

  • 2002 – 665
  • 2003 – 629
  • 2004 – 727
  • 2005 – 786
  • 2006 – 772
  • 2007 – 701
  • 2008 – 718
  • 2009 – 628
  • 2010 – 623
  • 2011 – 677

___________________________________________________________________

.

BREAKTHROUGH

From DC.streetsblog:

Protected bike lanes now have the official backing of the federal government.

In a significant step forward for American bike infrastructure, the Federal Highway Administration issued a memorandum late last month essentially endorsing street designs like protected bike lanes.

In the memorandum, FHWA urges transportation engineers to use the guidelines issued by the National Association of City Transportation Officials, which contains templates for bikeway designs widely deployed in Europe but shunned in the U.S. until very recently. This federal endorsement is critical because protected bike lanes have yet to be officially sanctioned by the country’s most influential transportation engineering organization: the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. AASHTO publishes the “green book,” which for many transportation departments serves as the bible of street design. But, being a bit stodgy, AASHTO has never included protected bike lanes in its standards, despite mounting evidence that these designs improve safety.

___________________________________________________________________

.

TRANSIT: NOT FASTER THAN A SPEEDING BIKE \

From a tweet by Stephen Rees: Bikes faster than public transport for most London journeys under 8 miles

___________________________________________________________________