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Brisbane, it’s said, is the largest subtropical city in the world with an Anglo culture.  And, it seemed, for a good part of its history, the climate was something to work around in order to maintain the look and feel of a British city.  Eating a restaurant meal outdoors, for instance, was pretty much unheard of until after Expo 88.

How things have changed.  Today, there’s a seamlessness between indoors and out that is one of the most attractive features of Brisbane design.

Oxford Street.

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The latest trendy restaurant on South Bank, with a plush couch just outside the entrance.

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During the day, outdoor seating on north-facing restaurants has to accommodate for the intensity of the sun.

Black-and-white blinds for a sidewalk cafe in Woolloongabba.

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Purpose-built pavillions are integrated into the downtown pedestrian malls:.

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Outdoor-style seating is even incorporated into interior spaces, like this example at the James Street market:

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One of my favourite spaces is the cafe for Queensland’s State Library – practically wall-less, protected by the overhang of the building:

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But in most cases, Brisbaners don’t have to leave home for the indoor-outdoor experience: it’s incorporated into their homes, with large balconies or verandas that are practically indistinguishable from the living rooms, separated only by folding glass walls that remain open for a good part of the year: