I’ve covered Project 200 – the massive urban-renewal proposal for Vancouver’s waterfront – a few times in the past: in Price Tags 20 and here on the blog.  But Jason Vanderhill has done us all a real service by scanning the original 1968 report on to his Flickr stream so you can read all the gruesome details for yourself.

Irresistibly, though, I have to post a few of the best images here – beginning with the cover:

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The site would have demolished practically everything from Howe to Abbott Streets, north of Cordova, and covered over the rail tracks on the CPR yards, with a southern extension to Woodwards on the east side.

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The CPR station (now Waterfront) would have been ploughed under (but not, it appears, the Woodward’s department store) to be replaced by this modernist mixed-use complex:

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Its major public amenity was arguably the interconnected pedestrian plazas, elevated from the streets and above the tracks, that would have given access to the waterfront views.  The rendering is in pure 1960s style, right down to a man with a pipe and a boy with a balloon:

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The project assumed a waterfront freeway that was part of the larger vision being promoted at the time, of a city connected to the Trans-Canada Highway to the east and west, and to Highway 99/I-5 to the south:

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From the freeway, access was provided directly into the parking garages below the towers:

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It may have been the death of the freeway proposal that ended the prospect of Project 200.  But one piece did get built – Granville Square:

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To get a sense today of what our tomorrow could have been like, you can go to the north foot of Granville Street – the parking garage at grade, the sterile plaza above – and experience what Project 200 could have done to this city.

For more, including the text, go here.