Tags

, , ,


These days it’s possible for media to take vast amounts of information – the census – and to create reader-friendly interfaces like these.

Global News has generated 2011 Canadian census-tract maps for population and density here.

.

The New York Times produced an interface for the 2010 U.S. census, with many more layers, here.

.

So what better time to check out the veracity of the belief that the West End is the densest residential area in North America.

Here’s the densest census tract downtown: 28,078.8 people per square kilometre.

 

.

The densest census tract on Manhattan that I could find: 200,764.2 people per square mile (or 77,545.1 per square kilometre).

 

 .

The West End is not even close.  However, the overall density of Manhattan is 26,832 – less than the West End’s densest part.  So the myth has some basis in fact.

But how about in Canada?  Nope: both Montreal and Toronto have significantly higher pockets of density.  In Montreal, the student ghetto just east of McGill, at 30,117.2 people per square kiometre:

.

In Toronto, not surprisingly in St. James Town, Canada’s densest census tract (that I’ve found), at 60,915.4 :

.

Though I don’t have data to back this up, my impression is that all these various locations cover a good part of the economic spectrum, from Upper East Side New Yorkers to refugees in St. James Town.

Another interesting factoid that I came across: the population has fallen by a few percent in most census tracts in the West End.