How have you heard about Stewart Brand?

Perhaps as founder of the Whole Earth CatalogOr of The Well, a precursor to today’s social networks.  Or maybe as cofounder of the Global Business Network or The Long Now Foundation.

Whether you realize it or not, your awareness of the world has been influenced by Stewart Brand. He thought the image of our planet might be a powerful symbol, so in 1966 he campaigned to have NASA release the then-rumoured satellite image of the entire Earth as seen from space. He distributed buttons — for 25 cents each — asking, “Why haven’t we seen a photograph of the whole Earth yet?” In 1968, a NASA astronaut made the photo public,  and in 1970, not coincidentally, Earth Day began to be celebrated. Brand explained that the image “gave the sense that Earth’s an island, surrounded by a lot of inhospitable space.”

He is on the board of the Santa Fe Institute, and maintains connections with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Wired magazine and MIT’s Media Lab, while occasionally consulting for Ecotrust. He is the original editor of The Whole Earth Catalog (winner of the National Book Award); author of The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at MIT; How Buildings Learn; and The Clock of the Long Now: Time and Responsibility (MasterMinds Series); and Two Cybernetic Frontiers, on Gregory Bateson and cutting-edge computer science. It had the first use of the term “personal computer” in print and was the first book to report on computer hackers.

Most recently, he is author of “Whole Earth Discipline” — a provocative book that is likely to make one question the entire range of thinking on the state of the earth and how we should respond. Whether you agree with Stewart Brand or not, you have to hear what he has to say —something you’ve been doing all your life, whether you know it or not.

This free lecture will probably fill up quickly.  Reserve now – but only if you intend to go.  Otherwise, others who do may not be able to get seats.

Stewart Brand and “Whole Earth Discipline” —October 4, 2010, 7 pm
Venue: Milton and Fei Wong Experimental Theatre, SFU Woodwards, 149 West Hastings Street, Vancouver
Admission is free, reservations are required.

Reserve here.

Stewart Brand: “Always two steps ahead of others…..(he) is the least recognized, most influential thinker in America.” LA Times.